myocardial infarction

myocardial infarction get help at

myocardial infarction

The patient is a 73-year-old white woman admitted to the hospital with heart failure. She is compliant and seldom misses her medications. On admission, her medications were furosemide 40 mg po qd, enalapril 20 mg po bid, simvastatin 10 mg po qd, and aspirin 325 mg po qd. She usually functions at a NYHA class II level. She now has had two admissions for congestive heart failure in the past 4 months. On this admission, a myocardial infarction has already been ruled out and she remains in sinus rhythm. She has normal renal function with a serum creatinine of 0.7 mg/dL. The patient is particularly concerned about staying out of the hospital because she is very active in her community, lives alone, and has no one to care for her pets and plants. The primary care provider asks the team if digoxin would help shorten her hospital stay or keep her from being readmitted. You are asked to do a PubMed search and bring the answer to morning rounds.

You are a nursing student rotating in the ED. This is the first day of your rotation. The first case is a 34-year-old male complaining of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. myocardial infarction The team suspects appendicitis and asks you as the new student which is the better diagnostic tool – a scan or an ultrasound? You are overcome with a feeling of uncertainty and a strong urge to review the literature and find some impressive evidence to bring back to your preceptor. myocardial infarction

A 46-year-old male had been moving rocks for his rock garden when he felt a twinge and his low back became excruciatingly painful. He’s come into the Emergency Room and is extremely unhappy and demanding an MRI. You thought CT was the standard for diagnosis. Is there data to support this? myocardial infarction